Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
CAMPAIGN ANTHEM & CREATIVE CONCEPTS

Our goal was to present the OpenRange as something so impressive, you had to see it to believe it. Our anthem of “Open Unbelievable” captured this idea while playing off the name of the product. It also matched perfectly to our creative concept of a Sasquatch family camping trip, which gave us a fun, eye-catching way to illustrate the product’s features and benefits.

VIDEO PRODUCTION

To present the OpenRange as the easy-to-use meal prep solution for the modern camper, we wrote, directed, and produced a 1.5-minute launch video that demonstrated the product being used in a real-life — albeit slightly exaggerated — scenario. To keep the budget within the client’s constraints, we developed a story  that could be told in a single location and without dialog.

PHOTO ASSET DEVELOPMENT

During the video production, we also captured still images that carried the characters and narrative into other contexts. The goal was to efficiently build a database of images that would not only be used in the immediate campaign deliverables, but also for future advertising, as needed.

LANDING PAGE & EMAIL

We designed and developed a campaign landing page and announcement email, both built around our core creative concept and using the image assets we created.

ONLINE ADS

We developed a collection of social and display ads targeting the outdoor enthusiast market.

"We were stepping into new territory with a product in a new-to-us category.  With the advertising market being heavily saturated we needed to cut through the clutter and we knew the Blue Collar team was perfect for the job. And they sure delivered! From the ideation to the attention to detail with props and costumes to the fast turnaround and end result – they crushed it!  People will be talking about this campaign for years to come."
MARIE MAJOR, DIRECTOR OF CONSUMER EXPERIENCE

Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
APPROACH

Nothing short of an entirely new brand would suffice to address everything GOP now offered beyond “office products.” That meant starting where we always do with branding exercises: research. We spoke with stakeholders, analyzed competitors, put the NPS score under the microscope, and gathered insights from our work with other clients in the industry in the Portland and Seattle markets. This informed a brand strategy that laid the foundation for our creative and ensured every move we made was supported by data and formed a cohesive new vision.

Competitive Analysis

We analyzed the brands of five major competitors in the office procurement, design, and consulting space. We looked at logos, color palettes, typography, and brand voices to uncover opportunities for the newly-branded Acre to stand out.

Stakeholder Interviews

By interviewing both internal and external stakeholders, we pieced together the public perception of the brand, its services, and its partnership with Steelcase. We also looked into the concerns of the architecture and design world over Acre’s expansion into that domain.

Brand Voice

We developed an all-new brand persona, narrative, and set of attributes to express Acre’s renewed role as visionary partner to its clients and a supporting player to architecture and design and construction firms. We highlighted the brand’s spirit of collaboration while emphasizing its tried-and-true history of disciplined design and strong work ethic. Overall, we wanted to make sure that Acre’s clients would see it not as a company that would work for them, but one that would work with them.

Name and Anthem

The previous name, General Office Products, had equity and history behind it, but it was a direct, descriptive name that no longer described what the company did. It was also bland and came off as dated. We recognized right away that sticking with a descriptive name wouldn’t work — the company’s current services were too broad — so we leaned heavily into expressiveness.

Out of all the many options that surfaced, Acre was recognized as the best choice. It evokes an image of openness, expansiveness, and freedom of creativity — qualities that led us right into the new brand anthem: Places of possibility.

Logo and Visual Identity

We wanted to pair an expressive name with an equally expressive logo, one that was also recognizable and easy to read. We also knew we had to move away from the black end of the color spectrum, where the GOP logo fell and which our competitive analysis revealed to be overcrowded with other brands. The green “crop circles” design addressed all of these concerns. Additionally, it plays off of the name in a fun way, can be arranged either in a line or a box formation for different uses, and the leading “a” can stand alone as a strong brand mark.

“The Blue Collar team got to know our organization, customers, and local market prior to starting on the brand voice, naming and visual identity.  We truly appreciated this, because it is so important to have a genuine approach in our industry.  They took a dated brand and helped us create something new/fresh while preserving what is great about our history as well as our employees.”
- BEN CRAWFORD, VP MANAGING DIRECTOR

Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
APPROACH

Nothing short of an entirely new brand would suffice to address everything GOP now offered beyond “office products.” That meant starting where we always do with branding exercises: research. We spoke with stakeholders, analyzed competitors, put the NPS score under the microscope, and gathered insights from our work with other clients in the industry in the Portland and Seattle markets. This informed a brand strategy that laid the foundation for our creative and ensured every move we made was supported by data and formed a cohesive new vision.

Competitive Analysis

We analyzed the brands of five major competitors in the office procurement, design, and consulting space. We looked at logos, color palettes, typography, and brand voices to uncover opportunities for the newly-branded Acre to stand out.

Stakeholder Interviews

By interviewing both internal and external stakeholders, we pieced together the public perception of the brand, its services, and its partnership with Steelcase. We also looked into the concerns of the architecture and design world over Acre’s expansion into that domain.

Brand Voice

We developed an all-new brand persona, narrative, and set of attributes to express Acre’s renewed role as visionary partner to its clients and a supporting player to architecture and design and construction firms. We highlighted the brand’s spirit of collaboration while emphasizing its tried-and-true history of disciplined design and strong work ethic. Overall, we wanted to make sure that Acre’s clients would see it not as a company that would work for them, but one that would work with them.

Name and Anthem

The previous name, General Office Products, had equity and history behind it, but it was a direct, descriptive name that no longer described what the company did. It was also bland and came off as dated. We recognized right away that sticking with a descriptive name wouldn’t work — the company’s current services were too broad — so we leaned heavily into expressiveness.

Out of all the many options that surfaced, Acre was recognized as the best choice. It evokes an image of openness, expansiveness, and freedom of creativity — qualities that led us right into the new brand anthem: Places of possibility.

Logo and Visual Identity

We wanted to pair an expressive name with an equally expressive logo, one that was also recognizable and easy to read. We also knew we had to move away from the black end of the color spectrum, where the GOP logo fell and which our competitive analysis revealed to be overcrowded with other brands. The green “crop circles” design addressed all of these concerns. Additionally, it plays off of the name in a fun way, can be arranged either in a line or a box formation for different uses, and the leading “a” can stand alone as a strong brand mark.

“The Blue Collar team got to know our organization, customers, and local market prior to starting on the brand voice, naming and visual identity.  We truly appreciated this, because it is so important to have a genuine approach in our industry.  They took a dated brand and helped us create something new/fresh while preserving what is great about our history as well as our employees.”
- BEN CRAWFORD, VP MANAGING DIRECTOR

“We were looking to own the digital bike space – launching two new bike racks – for a short time period and we wanted omnichannel consistency. A tremendous amount of work went into the design and development of the new StageTwo and HangTight bike racks so it was only right that the launch be given the same amount of respect. Blue Collar shifted into high gear and topped the podium. Not only were the ideas they brought to the table fresh and on-brand but they presented the level of stoke we were looking for.“
-  MARIE MAJOR, DIRECTOR OF CONSUMER EXPERIENCE

Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
APPROACH

Nothing short of an entirely new brand would suffice to address everything GOP now offered beyond “office products.” That meant starting where we always do with branding exercises: research. We spoke with stakeholders, analyzed competitors, put the NPS score under the microscope, and gathered insights from our work with other clients in the industry in the Portland and Seattle markets. This informed a brand strategy that laid the foundation for our creative and ensured every move we made was supported by data and formed a cohesive new vision.

Competitive Analysis

We analyzed the brands of five major competitors in the office procurement, design, and consulting space. We looked at logos, color palettes, typography, and brand voices to uncover opportunities for the newly-branded Acre to stand out.

Stakeholder Interviews

By interviewing both internal and external stakeholders, we pieced together the public perception of the brand, its services, and its partnership with Steelcase. We also looked into the concerns of the architecture and design world over Acre’s expansion into that domain.

Brand Voice

We developed an all-new brand persona, narrative, and set of attributes to express Acre’s renewed role as visionary partner to its clients and a supporting player to architecture and design and construction firms. We highlighted the brand’s spirit of collaboration while emphasizing its tried-and-true history of disciplined design and strong work ethic. Overall, we wanted to make sure that Acre’s clients would see it not as a company that would work for them, but one that would work with them.

Name and Anthem

The previous name, General Office Products, had equity and history behind it, but it was a direct, descriptive name that no longer described what the company did. It was also bland and came off as dated. We recognized right away that sticking with a descriptive name wouldn’t work — the company’s current services were too broad — so we leaned heavily into expressiveness.

Out of all the many options that surfaced, Acre was recognized as the best choice. It evokes an image of openness, expansiveness, and freedom of creativity — qualities that led us right into the new brand anthem: Places of possibility.

Logo and Visual Identity

We wanted to pair an expressive name with an equally expressive logo, one that was also recognizable and easy to read. We also knew we had to move away from the black end of the color spectrum, where the GOP logo fell and which our competitive analysis revealed to be overcrowded with other brands. The green “crop circles” design addressed all of these concerns. Additionally, it plays off of the name in a fun way, can be arranged either in a line or a box formation for different uses, and the leading “a” can stand alone as a strong brand mark.

“The Blue Collar team got to know our organization, customers, and local market prior to starting on the brand voice, naming and visual identity.  We truly appreciated this, because it is so important to have a genuine approach in our industry.  They took a dated brand and helped us create something new/fresh while preserving what is great about our history as well as our employees.”
- BEN CRAWFORD, VP MANAGING DIRECTOR

“We were looking to own the digital bike space – launching two new bike racks – for a short time period and we wanted omnichannel consistency. A tremendous amount of work went into the design and development of the new StageTwo and HangTight bike racks so it was only right that the launch be given the same amount of respect. Blue Collar shifted into high gear and topped the podium. Not only were the ideas they brought to the table fresh and on-brand but they presented the level of stoke we were looking for.“
-  MARIE MAJOR, DIRECTOR OF CONSUMER EXPERIENCE

Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
APPROACH

Nothing short of an entirely new brand would suffice to address everything GOP now offered beyond “office products.” That meant starting where we always do with branding exercises: research. We spoke with stakeholders, analyzed competitors, put the NPS score under the microscope, and gathered insights from our work with other clients in the industry in the Portland and Seattle markets. This informed a brand strategy that laid the foundation for our creative and ensured every move we made was supported by data and formed a cohesive new vision.

Competitive Analysis

We analyzed the brands of five major competitors in the office procurement, design, and consulting space. We looked at logos, color palettes, typography, and brand voices to uncover opportunities for the newly-branded Acre to stand out.

Stakeholder Interviews

By interviewing both internal and external stakeholders, we pieced together the public perception of the brand, its services, and its partnership with Steelcase. We also looked into the concerns of the architecture and design world over Acre’s expansion into that domain.

Brand Voice

We developed an all-new brand persona, narrative, and set of attributes to express Acre’s renewed role as visionary partner to its clients and a supporting player to architecture and design and construction firms. We highlighted the brand’s spirit of collaboration while emphasizing its tried-and-true history of disciplined design and strong work ethic. Overall, we wanted to make sure that Acre’s clients would see it not as a company that would work for them, but one that would work with them.

Name and Anthem

The previous name, General Office Products, had equity and history behind it, but it was a direct, descriptive name that no longer described what the company did. It was also bland and came off as dated. We recognized right away that sticking with a descriptive name wouldn’t work — the company’s current services were too broad — so we leaned heavily into expressiveness.

Out of all the many options that surfaced, Acre was recognized as the best choice. It evokes an image of openness, expansiveness, and freedom of creativity — qualities that led us right into the new brand anthem: Places of possibility.

Logo and Visual Identity

We wanted to pair an expressive name with an equally expressive logo, one that was also recognizable and easy to read. We also knew we had to move away from the black end of the color spectrum, where the GOP logo fell and which our competitive analysis revealed to be overcrowded with other brands. The green “crop circles” design addressed all of these concerns. Additionally, it plays off of the name in a fun way, can be arranged either in a line or a box formation for different uses, and the leading “a” can stand alone as a strong brand mark.

“The Blue Collar team got to know our organization, customers, and local market prior to starting on the brand voice, naming and visual identity.  We truly appreciated this, because it is so important to have a genuine approach in our industry.  They took a dated brand and helped us create something new/fresh while preserving what is great about our history as well as our employees.”
- BEN CRAWFORD, VP MANAGING DIRECTOR

I so appreciate Blue Collar giving me the opportunity to get a behind the scenes look at the photo shoot. It was incredible to see the amount of thought and preparation that went into each shot, and how passionate each member of the team was about what they were doing. Everyone involved clearly cared deeply about the images they were capturing and the story they were telling with those images, and it was a privilege for me to see them in action. And certainly the highlight of the day was getting the opportunity to fly in one of TacAero’s tailwheel planes, what an amazing experience!
-  MARK SCHREIBER, PRESIDENT

Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
APPROACH

Nothing short of an entirely new brand would suffice to address everything GOP now offered beyond “office products.” That meant starting where we always do with branding exercises: research. We spoke with stakeholders, analyzed competitors, put the NPS score under the microscope, and gathered insights from our work with other clients in the industry in the Portland and Seattle markets. This informed a brand strategy that laid the foundation for our creative and ensured every move we made was supported by data and formed a cohesive new vision.

Competitive Analysis

We analyzed the brands of five major competitors in the office procurement, design, and consulting space. We looked at logos, color palettes, typography, and brand voices to uncover opportunities for the newly-branded Acre to stand out.

Stakeholder Interviews

By interviewing both internal and external stakeholders, we pieced together the public perception of the brand, its services, and its partnership with Steelcase. We also looked into the concerns of the architecture and design world over Acre’s expansion into that domain.

Brand Voice

We developed an all-new brand persona, narrative, and set of attributes to express Acre’s renewed role as visionary partner to its clients and a supporting player to architecture and design and construction firms. We highlighted the brand’s spirit of collaboration while emphasizing its tried-and-true history of disciplined design and strong work ethic. Overall, we wanted to make sure that Acre’s clients would see it not as a company that would work for them, but one that would work with them.

Name and Anthem

The previous name, General Office Products, had equity and history behind it, but it was a direct, descriptive name that no longer described what the company did. It was also bland and came off as dated. We recognized right away that sticking with a descriptive name wouldn’t work — the company’s current services were too broad — so we leaned heavily into expressiveness.

Out of all the many options that surfaced, Acre was recognized as the best choice. It evokes an image of openness, expansiveness, and freedom of creativity — qualities that led us right into the new brand anthem: Places of possibility.

Logo and Visual Identity

We wanted to pair an expressive name with an equally expressive logo, one that was also recognizable and easy to read. We also knew we had to move away from the black end of the color spectrum, where the GOP logo fell and which our competitive analysis revealed to be overcrowded with other brands. The green “crop circles” design addressed all of these concerns. Additionally, it plays off of the name in a fun way, can be arranged either in a line or a box formation for different uses, and the leading “a” can stand alone as a strong brand mark.

“The Blue Collar team got to know our organization, customers, and local market prior to starting on the brand voice, naming and visual identity.  We truly appreciated this, because it is so important to have a genuine approach in our industry.  They took a dated brand and helped us create something new/fresh while preserving what is great about our history as well as our employees.”
- BEN CRAWFORD, VP MANAGING DIRECTOR

CRKT 2021 Lifestyle Shoot

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
CAMPAIGN STRATEGY

Instead of creating stories that uplifted and illustrated their long-standing, powerful brand strategy: Confidence in Hand, we went out into the world and found them. After days of diving deep into our adventurous rolodexes and making phone call after phone call, we found three guys that lived Confidence in Hand every day.

CONTENT DEVELOPMENT

Instead of zeroing in on the story of the knives, we dove into the stories of the three rugged, march-by-the-beat-of-your-own drum guys. This is when the knives came to life in ways we could never tell in a studio or a product description. This is where Confidence in Hand truly makes sense—in the angry oceans, the expansive skies, and deep in the woods. We were there to capture it all.

ROLLOUT

We created three full-blown blog posts that became the epicenter of these stories. Replete with photos, video, and an honest retelling, this is where we drove traffic from all other channels. Embedded within these posts (and elsewhere, too) we embedded powerful calls to purchase.

EXECUTION

The Wells Fargo Careers site is chock full of engaging information and resources for job seekers so we amplified their presence with a UX exercise and reimagination of what their site could do. Using full-width design, we brought our story to life with color, escorting the user through the value proposition of a job at Wells Fargo while providing them ample opportunity to click through and get their application process started or find a story that better suited them.

Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
APPROACH

Nothing short of an entirely new brand would suffice to address everything GOP now offered beyond “office products.” That meant starting where we always do with branding exercises: research. We spoke with stakeholders, analyzed competitors, put the NPS score under the microscope, and gathered insights from our work with other clients in the industry in the Portland and Seattle markets. This informed a brand strategy that laid the foundation for our creative and ensured every move we made was supported by data and formed a cohesive new vision.

Competitive Analysis

We analyzed the brands of five major competitors in the office procurement, design, and consulting space. We looked at logos, color palettes, typography, and brand voices to uncover opportunities for the newly-branded Acre to stand out.

Stakeholder Interviews

By interviewing both internal and external stakeholders, we pieced together the public perception of the brand, its services, and its partnership with Steelcase. We also looked into the concerns of the architecture and design world over Acre’s expansion into that domain.

Brand Voice

We developed an all-new brand persona, narrative, and set of attributes to express Acre’s renewed role as visionary partner to its clients and a supporting player to architecture and design and construction firms. We highlighted the brand’s spirit of collaboration while emphasizing its tried-and-true history of disciplined design and strong work ethic. Overall, we wanted to make sure that Acre’s clients would see it not as a company that would work for them, but one that would work with them.

Name and Anthem

The previous name, General Office Products, had equity and history behind it, but it was a direct, descriptive name that no longer described what the company did. It was also bland and came off as dated. We recognized right away that sticking with a descriptive name wouldn’t work — the company’s current services were too broad — so we leaned heavily into expressiveness.

Out of all the many options that surfaced, Acre was recognized as the best choice. It evokes an image of openness, expansiveness, and freedom of creativity — qualities that led us right into the new brand anthem: Places of possibility.

Logo and Visual Identity

We wanted to pair an expressive name with an equally expressive logo, one that was also recognizable and easy to read. We also knew we had to move away from the black end of the color spectrum, where the GOP logo fell and which our competitive analysis revealed to be overcrowded with other brands. The green “crop circles” design addressed all of these concerns. Additionally, it plays off of the name in a fun way, can be arranged either in a line or a box formation for different uses, and the leading “a” can stand alone as a strong brand mark.

“The Blue Collar team got to know our organization, customers, and local market prior to starting on the brand voice, naming and visual identity.  We truly appreciated this, because it is so important to have a genuine approach in our industry.  They took a dated brand and helped us create something new/fresh while preserving what is great about our history as well as our employees.”
- BEN CRAWFORD, VP MANAGING DIRECTOR

Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
APPROACH

Nothing short of an entirely new brand would suffice to address everything GOP now offered beyond “office products.” That meant starting where we always do with branding exercises: research. We spoke with stakeholders, analyzed competitors, put the NPS score under the microscope, and gathered insights from our work with other clients in the industry in the Portland and Seattle markets. This informed a brand strategy that laid the foundation for our creative and ensured every move we made was supported by data and formed a cohesive new vision.

Competitive Analysis

We analyzed the brands of five major competitors in the office procurement, design, and consulting space. We looked at logos, color palettes, typography, and brand voices to uncover opportunities for the newly-branded Acre to stand out.

Stakeholder Interviews

By interviewing both internal and external stakeholders, we pieced together the public perception of the brand, its services, and its partnership with Steelcase. We also looked into the concerns of the architecture and design world over Acre’s expansion into that domain.

Brand Voice

We developed an all-new brand persona, narrative, and set of attributes to express Acre’s renewed role as visionary partner to its clients and a supporting player to architecture and design and construction firms. We highlighted the brand’s spirit of collaboration while emphasizing its tried-and-true history of disciplined design and strong work ethic. Overall, we wanted to make sure that Acre’s clients would see it not as a company that would work for them, but one that would work with them.

Name and Anthem

The previous name, General Office Products, had equity and history behind it, but it was a direct, descriptive name that no longer described what the company did. It was also bland and came off as dated. We recognized right away that sticking with a descriptive name wouldn’t work — the company’s current services were too broad — so we leaned heavily into expressiveness.

Out of all the many options that surfaced, Acre was recognized as the best choice. It evokes an image of openness, expansiveness, and freedom of creativity — qualities that led us right into the new brand anthem: Places of possibility.

Logo and Visual Identity

We wanted to pair an expressive name with an equally expressive logo, one that was also recognizable and easy to read. We also knew we had to move away from the black end of the color spectrum, where the GOP logo fell and which our competitive analysis revealed to be overcrowded with other brands. The green “crop circles” design addressed all of these concerns. Additionally, it plays off of the name in a fun way, can be arranged either in a line or a box formation for different uses, and the leading “a” can stand alone as a strong brand mark.

“The Blue Collar team got to know our organization, customers, and local market prior to starting on the brand voice, naming and visual identity.  We truly appreciated this, because it is so important to have a genuine approach in our industry.  They took a dated brand and helped us create something new/fresh while preserving what is great about our history as well as our employees.”
- BEN CRAWFORD, VP MANAGING DIRECTOR

MARKETING STRATEGY

From our research, we knew that our core demographic is highly engaged on Instagram, stays on top of her email inbox, and is the primary trip planner for her family and friend group. So we crafted our marketing strategy around reaching her with relevant and timely information on the platforms she frequents. We also work hand-in-hand with a PR firm to ensure our strategies are in lockstep and mutually beneficial.

WEBSITE

Guided by a new Visit Hood River tourism initiative, our team commenced a site overhaul by developing an SEO and UX optimized channel from scratch. The new digital space presents a welcoming, unique experience for inquisitive, first-time Hood River visitors, to enlivening the stories of local businesses. The culmination of best-in-class front-end components and freshly branded design elements amounts to a digital space we’re ever-so proud to present.

“Blue Collar Agency is a creative powerhouse, consistently producing refreshing, original content for our brand and strategy. They excel in their ability to listen to the demands of the destination marketing industry and drive strategy while adapting to the ever changing needs. Blue Collar agency is truly an extension of the Visit Hood River team.”
- ASHLEY HUCKABY MAY - DIRECTOR

Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
APPROACH

Nothing short of an entirely new brand would suffice to address everything GOP now offered beyond “office products.” That meant starting where we always do with branding exercises: research. We spoke with stakeholders, analyzed competitors, put the NPS score under the microscope, and gathered insights from our work with other clients in the industry in the Portland and Seattle markets. This informed a brand strategy that laid the foundation for our creative and ensured every move we made was supported by data and formed a cohesive new vision.

Competitive Analysis

We analyzed the brands of five major competitors in the office procurement, design, and consulting space. We looked at logos, color palettes, typography, and brand voices to uncover opportunities for the newly-branded Acre to stand out.

Stakeholder Interviews

By interviewing both internal and external stakeholders, we pieced together the public perception of the brand, its services, and its partnership with Steelcase. We also looked into the concerns of the architecture and design world over Acre’s expansion into that domain.

Brand Voice

We developed an all-new brand persona, narrative, and set of attributes to express Acre’s renewed role as visionary partner to its clients and a supporting player to architecture and design and construction firms. We highlighted the brand’s spirit of collaboration while emphasizing its tried-and-true history of disciplined design and strong work ethic. Overall, we wanted to make sure that Acre’s clients would see it not as a company that would work for them, but one that would work with them.

Name and Anthem

The previous name, General Office Products, had equity and history behind it, but it was a direct, descriptive name that no longer described what the company did. It was also bland and came off as dated. We recognized right away that sticking with a descriptive name wouldn’t work — the company’s current services were too broad — so we leaned heavily into expressiveness.

Out of all the many options that surfaced, Acre was recognized as the best choice. It evokes an image of openness, expansiveness, and freedom of creativity — qualities that led us right into the new brand anthem: Places of possibility.

Logo and Visual Identity

We wanted to pair an expressive name with an equally expressive logo, one that was also recognizable and easy to read. We also knew we had to move away from the black end of the color spectrum, where the GOP logo fell and which our competitive analysis revealed to be overcrowded with other brands. The green “crop circles” design addressed all of these concerns. Additionally, it plays off of the name in a fun way, can be arranged either in a line or a box formation for different uses, and the leading “a” can stand alone as a strong brand mark.

“The Blue Collar team got to know our organization, customers, and local market prior to starting on the brand voice, naming and visual identity.  We truly appreciated this, because it is so important to have a genuine approach in our industry.  They took a dated brand and helped us create something new/fresh while preserving what is great about our history as well as our employees.”
- BEN CRAWFORD, VP MANAGING DIRECTOR

Acre

Places of Possibility
What we did
Research
Brand Strategy
Brand Voice
Naming and Brand Anthem
Visual Identity Design
The Ask
Established in 1963, General Office Products has been a force in the Minneapolis & St. Paul workspace design community. As one of the exclusive Steelcase furniture distributors in the twin cities, GOP’s core competencies have been traditionally aligned with commercial interior furniture, fixtures, and equipment, with an expertise in workplace strategy and design. In an increasingly fragmented and competitive market, there was an immediate need to bring GOP’s brand voice & visual identity into a more progressive light.
APPROACH

Nothing short of an entirely new brand would suffice to address everything GOP now offered beyond “office products.” That meant starting where we always do with branding exercises: research. We spoke with stakeholders, analyzed competitors, put the NPS score under the microscope, and gathered insights from our work with other clients in the industry in the Portland and Seattle markets. This informed a brand strategy that laid the foundation for our creative and ensured every move we made was supported by data and formed a cohesive new vision.

Competitive Analysis

We analyzed the brands of five major competitors in the office procurement, design, and consulting space. We looked at logos, color palettes, typography, and brand voices to uncover opportunities for the newly-branded Acre to stand out.

Stakeholder Interviews

By interviewing both internal and external stakeholders, we pieced together the public perception of the brand, its services, and its partnership with Steelcase. We also looked into the concerns of the architecture and design world over Acre’s expansion into that domain.

Brand Voice

We developed an all-new brand persona, narrative, and set of attributes to express Acre’s renewed role as visionary partner to its clients and a supporting player to architecture and design and construction firms. We highlighted the brand’s spirit of collaboration while emphasizing its tried-and-true history of disciplined design and strong work ethic. Overall, we wanted to make sure that Acre’s clients would see it not as a company that would work for them, but one that would work with them.

Name and Anthem

The previous name, General Office Products, had equity and history behind it, but it was a direct, descriptive name that no longer described what the company did. It was also bland and came off as dated. We recognized right away that sticking with a descriptive name wouldn’t work — the company’s current services were too broad — so we leaned heavily into expressiveness.

Out of all the many options that surfaced, Acre was recognized as the best choice. It evokes an image of openness, expansiveness, and freedom of creativity — qualities that led us right into the new brand anthem: Places of possibility.

Logo and Visual Identity

We wanted to pair an expressive name with an equally expressive logo, one that was also recognizable and easy to read. We also knew we had to move away from the black end of the color spectrum, where the GOP logo fell and which our competitive analysis revealed to be overcrowded with other brands. The green “crop circles” design addressed all of these concerns. Additionally, it plays off of the name in a fun way, can be arranged either in a line or a box formation for different uses, and the leading “a” can stand alone as a strong brand mark.

“The Blue Collar team got to know our organization, customers, and local market prior to starting on the brand voice, naming and visual identity.  We truly appreciated this, because it is so important to have a genuine approach in our industry.  They took a dated brand and helped us create something new/fresh while preserving what is great about our history as well as our employees.”
- BEN CRAWFORD, VP MANAGING DIRECTOR

"Sigma and Blue Collar have a long and collaborative history. They know our business well and all of their work reflects the richness of the relationship. When the time came to upgrade our website, they understood the goal of improving engagement with our current customers and attracting new ones, inspiring loyalty in both. With the new site, SIGMA stands out in a smart, attractive, and impressive way. Almost immediately, we saw results that spoke to the goal. As the person responsible for budgets, deadlines, and end results, I must mention that every member of the BC team, both on the creative and account sides, made the process as straightforward, transparent, and painless as possible. Thank you, Blue Collar, for beautifully positioning SIGMA for the future!"
CHRISTINE MOOSSMAN, DIRECTOR OF MARKETING
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